There’s a new drug on the market – it’s called Paradox.  As you might expect (the clue is in the name), it’s no ordinary drug… it dispenses an effect quite the opposite to what you would have anticipated.  It’s not a drug you can buy over the counter; well, unless you recognise the internet equivalent.  And this drug is so potent, you’re probably surprised you’ve never heard of it.  And yet, this drug is now the most common administered substance available online – you undoubtedly will have consumed it already, without you knowing it.

Intrigued?  I was too.  And, more to the point, the more Paradox I take, the more intrigued I become – you think you are getting better (that’s why we take medicine), but you just keep getting worse.  When the internet started, Paradox wasn’t available.  After all, the internet brought high hopes: economies of scale to be had; new markets to grow into; and different ways of doing things… millions of them.  Paradox wasn’t needed.  We even constructed standards to abide by.  We built security protocols to be proud of.  And yet the bigger the internet became, and the more we wanted to consume data, the more we found ourselves in need of Paradox.  There are now 3 billion patients globally who take Paradox on a daily basis.

When a doctor says, “this will be good for you – it will make you better,” we believe them.  When the largest IT companies in the world tell us, “the internet will bring you prosperity and longer lives,” we put our faith in the message.  We don’t ask the doctor if the drugs have been tested – we unequivocally accept their discipline and the government regulations to ensure doctors and pharmacists have only the best drugs available.  And the same is true for IT – we believe that security measures are second to none, whilst government regulations will protect us.  But… whereas the health sector has proven its worth, IT has created a new health drug, Paradox.

Every private, public and government organisation under the sun has embraced IT, which has fed their very soul to the extent that all these enterprises, firms, businesses, and public bodies have forgotten why they existed in the first place.  They exist to serve us, the punters, the patients, the consumers, the customers, the voters, the citizens, the individuals.  And now we are so high on the promise that we need a little Paradox to bring us back down to earth.  But that’s the thing.  The more Paradox we take, the higher we get on our internet fix, and the more Paradox we need.

What happens when IT security fails?  We spend more money on it.  And when it fails again.  We do the same.  And so on, ad infinitum.  We are told everything will be all right.  We take a good dose of Paradox.  And whenever we buy this wonder drug, we don’t just feed ourselves, we feed the very corporates that we all work for, as well as feeding all the organisations that we transact with.  We all get high – every person and every body corporate.  No matter how absurd the reality, research shows this to be true.  Paradox, a remarkable elixir.

Well, Dr IT – you are not a doctor.  Everything will not be all right.  The problem is that the price of Paradox has become too expensive.  We have realised that we are starting to pay for it, not with money any more, but our rights.  Our right to Privacy, Trust and Confidentiality.  Paradox has become a self-feeding parasite on society.  The issue is that whilst we common folk have recognised it for some time now, the companies and governments that peddle the internet have not realised what has been going on.  And we have lost faith in the promise of the internet.  Organisations have now lost our Trust.  And yet, the Paradox drug is evermore present.

What happens when faith and trust disintegrate?  Hope itself becomes forlorn.  The great expectations of growth and wealth – the economy – has a seizure.  And despite this happening right now, right under our noses… despite three quarters of us crying out for reason… despite all the Press about this addictive drug, Paradox – we are ignored.  The Chief Economist for the Bank of England has realised the risk in his Great Divide speech.  The question is: what’s the antidote to Paradox?  The answer: more Paradox.

The symptoms are clear.  Private data sitting on the internet is causing angst.  The previous medicine was security, perhaps with a dose of cyber insurance.  All perfectly reasonable temporary preventative measures.  However, the illness at best becomes dormant, till the next eruption.  To really deal with it, take some Paradox… take the private data off the internet.  As unbelievable as that sounds, it will work.  Putting private data back in the hands of the owners, who should have custodial control of it, will fix the problem.  Forever.  Don’t withdraw Paradox – sell more of it.. but with clear packaging that explains how to take the medicine.  As the old Mary Poppins song goes, “with a spoonful of sugar.”  In this case, the sugar is LifeBank.

Use one of the internet’s greatest tools, email, to find out more about how LifeBank should be administered with Paradox… info@lifebanksystems.com – failing that, follow @NomadSquire on another superb digital tool, Twitter.  Share this blog posting too.  Let’s get a fever going, and let the Paradox drug and LifeBank work their magic.